. kampong lorong buangkok .

This fast disappearing place has been somewhere that I’ve been wanting to visit since I first heard of its existence but, due to other commitments, procrastination and a whole lot of bullshit excuses, I somehow managed to put that thought aside for a period of time. Nevertheless, the idea of visiting this place has always been at the back of my mind and I know, deep inside, that it’s just a matter of time before I get about doing so . However, unlike many of the other local attractions that I had visited, this one might just vanish in due time … Just like how the Butterfly House at Amber Road no longer exist as it was partially demolished to make way for new developments. 😦  The long weekend came and both the boy and I made an impulsive decision to finally check out this forgotten land of paradise. And, this place is none other than the last surviving kampung on mainland Singapore – Kampong Lorong Buangkok.

Kampong Buangkok has been ringing in the news for the past couple of years, for all the wrong reasons as the government had the area slated for re-development. You know what that means … Off goes the last kampong and in comes the influx of HDB and condominiums. While there’s nothing wrong with building more HDB ( Well, I certainly want to bid for a HDB in a few years’ down the road!), it however, saddens me to know that the last traditional village will soon be vanishing.

The pictorial journey of Kampong Buangkok begins …
The door that leads to the little land of heritage

Kampong Lorong Buangkok
Despite having difficulties trying to locate this place that’s hidden from view from the main road, we managed to piece together the information provided by other netizens and arrived at our destination.

Partially tucked in a forested area, Kampong Buangkok sits on a 12,248 sq m plot of land, roughly the size of 3 football fields, and is apparently (according to articles dated in 2007-2008) home to an estimated 28 families. The following pictures portray a sight that juxtaposes modern living and simple, rustic kampong life, thus reflecting a view that’s not common in our cosmopolitan country. The kampong is also currently sitting on a land that is undergoing PCN (Park Connector Network) renovations.

PS: Part of the Kampong faces a row of luxurious landed properties, hence highlighting the extreme contrast between the 2 different kinds of housing.




A lovely patio that overlooks a vast of lush greenery
This particular house (too bad, MK didn’t take that many pics) seems to be slightly inspired by the Cottage/Al-fresco style and it’s my favourite amongst the many houses. In fact, I’m so inspired by it that I’m considering to pick up a couple of design tips for my future home!

Take a peek into the simple zinc-roofed and wooden housing in the Kampong. According to an article dated 30th August 2007, the kampong residents only have to pay a nominal rental amount, ranging from $6.50 (!!!) to $30 a month to the landlord. Gosh, can I just say that I’m jealous?! $6.50 for a month of rental for a landed property? Sounds like a deal that’s hard to resist.

It is often said that the trust amongst the kampong residents is so strong that they often leave their doors unlocked and open. However, a stroll around the kampong grounds on Sunday revealed that almost everyone had their windows and front door shut, thus contradicting to the much-talked about ‘kampong spirit’. While I certainly don’t doubt the strong community bonds amongst the residents, I however, believe that the influx of visitors (like us) is probably an invasion of their privacy/personal space and it had inevitably affected their way of living. *Guilty*

During our tour of the village, we observed that the residents made up of mainly Malay families and Chinese senior citizens; most of whom probably enjoy the rustic charm of kampong living. After all, we live in an urban concrete jungle that’s constantly buzzing with activities and events and to find a small plot of land that’s so close to nature to come home to is almost impossible. For the majority of us, it’s definitely not our cup of tea but for some, it’s back to the basics living.

Info: Do you know that the plot of land that the kampong is located at is reported to value an estimated $33 million? OMG. This only goes to show how much this kampong means to the landlord… for her to remain determined to fight off monetary temptations for sentimental values and friendship.







This 2-storey house is the most well-maintained amongst the cluster of 1-storey houses. Probably, belonging to the landlord, Ms Sng?







PUB has put up a Flood Advisory sign to warn all residents of upcoming tides, as this area is very prone to heavy flooding.

The trip to the last surviving kampung certainly brought back fond memories of my childhood when I used to stay in my previous house. Wait… I’m no Kampong kid (not my era duh!), but the design and architecture of the housing sort of reminds me of my previous house which was also built in the 1950s when my grandparents first purchased it. Nostalgia feelings.

Knowing that it will only be a matter of time before the kampong gives way to newer housing/facilities, I certainly hope to make  a return visit to Kampong Buangkok sometime later this year … Hopefully, with better pictures (I seriously need a new camera!) and an opportunity to interact with the residents! View this link for more artistic/lomo pictures from another photographer.

Advertisements

14 responses to “. kampong lorong buangkok .

  1. I’m very keen to visit this place. It’s not stated when it’s slated to be demolished from the websites I visited. Do you happen to know when? I wanna make sure I see the last kampong before it loses its battle to modernity forever.
    Thank you!

    • Hi Jolene 🙂

      Yes, I did some research about kampong buangkok but couldn’t find any information regarding the date that it’s slated for re-development. Well, the Butterfly House at Amber Road was first slated for re-development sometime in 2007 but I think the actual works only took place either late last yr/early this year. I did a blog post on it sometime last year and honestly, I didn’t think that they would demolish the place just yet. It saddens me whenever I see an empty patch of land in its place now.

      You really ought to visit the place soon. It’s not as ulu as some have said it to be. About a 5mins walk from the bus stop along Yio Chu Kang road. 🙂 if you need more details, let me know!

      • Hi,
        Thanx for the reply. I intend to go with some frenz. Which bus stop u referring to? Maybe you could send it to my email @ as stated.
        Thank u!

    • Hi Jolene,

      Sorry for the late reply. Been busy over the weekend. Anyway, I’ll drop you an email with the directions tonight. 🙂 I’m pretty sure that you’ll enjoy your day trip to kampong buangkok! By the way, please bring along a spray of mosquito repellent.

  2. This place is so beautiful! It’s so sad that all the paradises of the world are so quickly disappearing!

    • Hi Heather,

      I cannot help but to agree that urbanization is certainly replacing some of the old but beautiful wonders. 😦 As much as I enjoy the city view of skyscrapers, I still think it’s crucial to conserve parts of the older buildings/places for heritage purposes. 🙂

  3. hi, after reading all the things you said concerning Kampong Buang Kok, I certainly hopes to go there soonest possible, but where exactly can I alight?
    Pancy

    • Hi there

      So sorry for late reply. Been too busy at work and wordpress was down for quite a number of days. Anyway, i got the directions from this site:

      The Kampong is just off Yio Chu Kang Road, near the junction with Ang Mo Kio Ave 5. You can take buses 70, 103, 854, which ply the appropriate section of Yio Chu Kang Road. If you’re going by train from the south, stop at Serangoon station on the NEL and take 103 from the bus stop outside the community centre. If you’re coming from the north, then 854 from Yishun Interchange is probably the best option. Along Yio Chu Kang Road, one landmark you can use is St. Vincent de Paul church. It is on the side of Yio Chu Kang Rd opposite the Kampong, and there is a bus stop right outside it.

      You can literally see the kampong from Yio Chu Kang Rd. Take the stairs that go down to Gerald Drive beside the petrol station.

      Credit to the site above for directions. Hope it helps! You might have to walk a little, prob 5 mins walk from the bus stop. It’s located in the midst of the park. Hope this helps:)

  4. Hi can i have the direction too? thanks

    • Hi there

      So sorry for late reply. Been too busy at work and wordpress was down for quite a number of days. Anyway, i got the directions from this site:

      The Kampong is just off Yio Chu Kang Road, near the junction with Ang Mo Kio Ave 5. You can take buses 70, 103, 854, which ply the appropriate section of Yio Chu Kang Road. If you’re going by train from the south, stop at Serangoon station on the NEL and take 103 from the bus stop outside the community centre. If you’re coming from the north, then 854 from Yishun Interchange is probably the best option. Along Yio Chu Kang Road, one landmark you can use is St. Vincent de Paul church. It is on the side of Yio Chu Kang Rd opposite the Kampong, and there is a bus stop right outside it.

      You can literally see the kampong from Yio Chu Kang Rd. Take the stairs that go down to Gerald Drive beside the petrol station.

      Credit to the site above for directions. Just replied to another comment with the same directions. It’s not too hard to spot… Walk along the stretch of pathways and u will find that the village is situation in the midst of the park. Hope this helps! 🙂

  5. Very nice article on the ‘last surviving-thriving kampung of Singapore’. Good share! Reminds me so much of my toddler days at Kampung Haji Alias~So nostalgic!

    • Hi babe 🙂

      Thank you so much. I had a wonderful time there as it gave me a glimpse of the laidback but carefree life in a kampung. Not that I intend for it to be a commercial place of interest, but i think that those who are keen should drop by for a visit. Having said that, it’s still impt to ensure the privacy of the residents. 🙂

  6. Pingback: . the last kampong revisited . | the girl at the traffic light junction

  7. Hey there I am so glad I found your web site, I really found you
    by accident, while I was searching on Google for something else, Anyhow I am
    here now and would just like to say cheers for a remarkable post and a all round exciting blog (I also love the theme/design), I don’t have time to read through it all at
    the moment but I have saved it and also included your RSS feeds, so when I have time I will be back to read a great
    deal more, Please do keep up the superb work.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s